War in Heaven

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I sometimes wonder what it must have been like for Jews living in Germany circa 1935. As the storm clouds gathered, some must have thought, Let’s get out while we can. Others, however, would ignore the warning signs, labelling their more prescient neighbours as paranoid. Those others, much later as prisoners, were handed soap on their way to the “showers.” Even then, they may have continued to underestimate the peril.

History is a long, sad record of human imprisonment, punctuated by a few precious interludes of relative peace, prosperity and freedom. Do we delude ourselves that such imprisonment could never happen here?

 How thin are the walls which separate a well-ordered world from lurking chaos. (Carl Jung)

Now we face a “new normal” where civil liberties, the rule of law, democracy and privacy are threatened. We see before us the spectre of big tech censorship, robotics, AI, transhumanism, the singularity, total surveillance, a digital currency linked to social credit scores, and “the great reset.” Churchill described “a monstrous tyranny, never surpassed in the dark, lamentable catalogue of human crime…”, one made more sinister by the technology of his day.  Technology has grown exponentially since then and we will soon reach the singularity, a point in time when exponential growth in technology takes on an infinite value. How much greater then the need for eternal vigilance in the defence of freedom?

Imagine a dystopian future where there is no place to hide, no place to flee. America used to be a beacon for the world, a place of refuge for “the huddled masses yearning to breathe free”. In medieval times one could always retreat to Sherwood Forest to escape the evil barons, but not now. The technocrats of the future will have us all flagged and tagged.

Both traditional Christianity and Gnosticism proclaim we are in a war – a spiritual war. If it is a war, then it is a “wizard war”, a term used by Churchill to describe the deciding factor in WW2, intelligence and counterintelligence. The Allies won that war because they cracked the German naval code, called Enigma after the device that created the code. “Intelligence” means knowing what is true in the face of overwhelming lies and secrecy. It means discerning truth from falsehood, looking beneath the surface of accepted narratives.

The Secret Book of John describes how the demiurge enslaves humanity: “His power is in deception leading astray.” Therefore, “If you would be a real seeker after truth, it is necessary that at least once in your life you doubt, as far as possible, all things.” (Descartes) Doubt all the soothing words of re-assurance by those who hide behind a mask of piety. Doubt the official line.

The demiurge is the great counterfeiter, the creator of virtual realities, a liar from the beginning and the father of it, as Jesus said; but “the truth shall make you free.” (John 8:32)

The big lie of the demiurge is that we are helpless and cannot resist. “Resistance is futile,” say the Borg. The truth, according to The Secret Book of John, is that we are more powerful than he and that his triumph depends on concealing from us the knowledge of our true identity. Gnosticism is liberation through gnosis or knowledge. Therefore, know who you truly are. The creative imaginative power of human intelligence is but an iteration of the divine creative intelligence which brings all things into being.

Holocaust survivor and author Victor Frankl (Man’s Search for Meaning) won his private war with the Nazis, but the weapons of his warfare were not carnal but spiritual (as the New Testament tells us). In the camp, “plum tasks” with perks and benefits were offered to inmates, in return for undisclosed assignments. Victor always refused these rewards because he knew a liar when he saw one. Beware the Nazi bearing gifts. Those who volunteered did not get what they bargained for and frequently did not return. Even at the end, as liberation approached, the Nazis said, come with us, we will take you to the Allies in return for clemency.  Victor refused to leave the camp in those final days. Those who accepted the offers were never heard of again. He survived the camp by refusing to believe the lies and by activating his divine creative intelligence in the pursuit of his own dreams; in his case, the completion of a significant academic paper.

The fight against the demiurge begins once we stop believing the official line. The demiurge and his archons depend, for their very survival, on our belief, our intention and our engagement with them. (Secret Book of John) We are no longer food for them when we turn instead to our own dreams and our own creation. This is how we win. 

The first casualties of war are the credulous.

“These are the days which try our souls”, says Thomas Paine. “Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph.” (The American Crises)

© Adrian Charles Smith (2021)


5 thoughts on “War in Heaven

  1. Adrian, I read your very thoughtful essay once again.

    For a long time, America’s “Sherwood Forest” was “going out West.” That’s where you could start a new life and escape the rules-and-regulations back East. Mankind has always sought for a haven where it could regroup and escape the tyranny of the elite.

    Your definition of history is very close to how Will and Ariel Durant summed it up too. I’m rereading just now portions of their volume one of “The Story Of Civilization.” Some years ago I stopped reading it because it was just all the same thing, one long chronicle of the strong conquering the weak. Actually, one reason I went back to that volume is that I was looking for a quote for it, which I’d remembered. It had to do with the Turks conquering India:

    “Weakened by [internal division], it [India] succumbed to invaders; impoverished by invaders, it lost all power of resistance, and took refuge in supernatural consolations; it argued that both mastery and slavery were superficial delusions, and concluded that freedom of the body of the nation was hardly worth defending in so brief a life. The bitter lesson that may be drawn from this tragedy is that eternal vigilance is the price of civilization. A nation must love peace, but keep its powder dry.”

    The Indians are a philosophical people and the question of “worth defending in so brief a life” is a legitimate query, especially given the temporal nature of this world and the reality of the next. These are not easy issues.

    Thanks for the writing, best to you, W.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Wayne
      Thanks for your comment.
      Very interesting account of the Turkish invasion of India and their response to it, that liberty was”not worth defending in so brief a life” and that the master slave relationship was “a delusion”. I’m sure for those poor souls in Auschwitz, it was real enough. The issue it raises though is the interplay of collective and individual responsibility. Collective action really goes off the rails where the inner work has not been done. My thesis is that if enough people (individually) value their autonomy and are unwilling to be deceived, then the demiurge and his minions are bereft of power and this will be reflected in society as a whole. And yes, I do believe there is such a thing as “wilful ignorance”.
      Cheers!

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I decided to excise a small portion of your writing and feature it as a quote on the “Tyranny” page, to give it a bit of “lasting” stature on my site:

    Adrian Smith: “Imagine a dystopian future where there is no place to hide, no place to flee. America used to be a beacon for the world, a place of refuge for *“the huddled masses yearning to breathe free”*. In medieval times one could always retreat to Sherwood Forest to escape the evil barons, but not now. The technocrats of the future will have us all flagged and tagged.” My comment to Adrian: “For a long time, America’s ‘Sherwood Forest’ was ‘going out West.’ That’s where you could start a new life and escape the rules-and-regulations back East. Mankind has always sought for a haven where it could regroup and escape the tyranny of the elite.”

    Liked by 1 person

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